Vasectomy & Reversal

Vasectomy is a form of male birth control that cuts the supply of sperm to your semen. It’s done by cutting and sealing the tubes that carry sperm. Vasectomy has a low risk of problems and can usually be performed in an outpatient setting under local anesthesia. Before getting a vasectomy, you need to be certain you don’t want to father a child in the future. Although vasectomy reversals are possible, vasectomy should be considered a permanent form of male birth control. Vasectomy offers no protection from sexually transmitted infections.

Can Having a Vasectomy Cause Serious Problems and Pain?

Fears of serious problems or significant pain after vasectomy are unfounded. For example, a vasectomy won’t:

  • Affect your sexual performance. A vasectomy won’t affect your sex drive or your masculinity in any way other than preventing you from fathering a child. Men have even reported higher sexual satisfaction after a vasectomy.
  • Permanently damage your sexual organs. There’s very little risk that your testicles, penis, or other parts of your reproductive system will be injured during surgery.
  • Increase your risk of certain cancers. Although there have been some concerns about a possible link between vasectomy and testicular or prostate cancer in the past, there’s no proven link.
  • Increase your risk of heart disease. As with cancer fears, there doesn’t appear to be any link between vasectomy and heart problems.
  • Cause severe pain. You might feel minor pain and pulling or tugging during surgery, but severe pain is rare. Likewise, after surgery you might have some pain, but for most men the pain is minor and goes away after a few days.
Can I Have the Vasectomy Reversed?

Yes, during the procedure, a surgeon reconnects each tube (vas deferens) that carries sperm from a testicle into the semen. After a successful vasectomy reversal, sperm are again present in the semen, and you may be able to get your partner pregnant. Deciding to have a vasectomy reversal may happen for several reasons, including loss of a child, a change of heart or remarriage, or to treat chronic testicular pain after vasectomy. Many factors affect whether a reversal is successful in achieving pregnancy, including time since a vasectomy, partner age, and whether you had fertility issues before your vasectomy. Vasectomy reversal is more difficult than a vasectomy and is done using microsurgery, in which a surgeon uses a powerful surgical microscope to magnify the vas deferens as much as 40 times its size.

Why Choose Us?

  • Twelve highly trained, collaborative urological specialists all taking new patients
  • Four locations across the northern Ohio region
  • Consultation appointments scheduled within 5-7 days of referral
  • One-stop office for a wide range of urological conditions for both males and females
  • In-office lab testing and imaging
  • In-office medication dispensary
  • Comprehensive cancer care including kidney, ureter, bladder, prostate, and testicular cancers
  • Clinical navigation for BPH, Overactive Bladder and Prostate Cancer
  • Clinical Trials
  • We accept most insurance plans including Medicare, Medicaid, and VA